On Exhibit at Fruitlands Museum

Current Exhibitions

Fruitlands Museum is committed to sharing the unique perspectives of artists, both historical and contemporary. The frequently changing exhibitions offer a wide variety of selections from Fruitlands' collections, other museum and private collections, and contemporary artists from the New England region.

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The museum’s newest acquisition, the Elaine Ehrenkranz Basket Collection, will feature 80+ antique baskets from Native people around the world including North, Central and South America, Africa and Asia. Ehrenkranz had a lifelong interest in baskets, and she actively collected them from Native people living in all parts of the world. Most of all, she loved the process of learning about the art she collected and sharing that information with students, collectors and anyone interested in her collections.  Check the Museum calendar for many programs and activities relating to baskets throughout the Main Season.

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Artist-in-Residence Richard Kattman presents Transcendental Abstractions—an exhibit of abstract paintings created during his residency at Fruitlands.

Some of Richard's works are inspired by natural elements—sea, wind, sand, grass, sky, flowers, fields, woods, gardens and night stars. Some canvases are his views of the earth as it appears from space. Some are drawn from infinite places located within his subconscious. Others are explorations he takes at the speed of light to places he imagines in deep outer space. These artworks portray the fragility of life and the known universe.

Join us on June 14 from 2-4PM for the opening of Richard's exhibit of abstract paintings. Drop by the museum during the season to see Richard painting on the grounds. And on Centennial Saturday, June 21, add your own brush stroke to a community canvas with Richard.

Permanent Collections

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In June of 1843, Bronson Alcott, Charles Lane and a handful of followers left Concord and moved to this farmhouse in Harvard,Massachusetts.  Alcott brought his wife and four young daughters, including a 10 year old Louisa May Alcott.  They called this place Fruitlands because they intended to live off the "fruits of the land".  

Albert Bierstadt, San Rafael

Among Fruitlands extensive collection of Hudson River School landscapes, the Art Gallery features two works by Albert Bierstadt. The Hudson River School is a nineteenth century American art movement which focused on depicting a romanticized vision of an unexplored American landscape.

Native American Gallery at Fruitlands Museum

Our Native American collection includes over 1000 objects divided between New England, the Plains, Southwest, and Northwest Coast culture areas. Standing outside the Native American Museum, look out over the Nashua River valley and imagine what life was like here thousands of years ago.  We collaborate with Native Americans from all across the country to interpret the Native American past and present.

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Fruitlands holds one of the largest collections of vernacular portraits in the country. During the nineteenth century, New Englanders became increasingly interested in the concept of self representation through art.

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The Shaker Museum at Fruitlands was originally constructed in the Harvard Shaker Village in 1796 as an office. Fruitlands Museum founder, Clara Sears, moved it to Fruitlands Museums in 1920 after the Harvard Shaker village closed.
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The story of Fruitlands is the history of an evolving landscape. Located in rural Harvard, Massachusetts, Fruitlands has an unparalleled view across the Nashua River valley. Our 210 acre grounds is composed of varying cultural traditions and ecological habitats, we tell stories about the New England past.

Native Americans, Shakers, Transcendentalists, and nineteenth century artists each represent an important moment in the history of our New England landscape.